Review: Fieldview 2018, an ode to my favourite festival

Once again the Wiltshire countryside was graced with the arrival of Fieldview festival this summer, for one final blowout before the organisers go their separate ways after announcing an indefinite hiatus earlier this year.

Fieldview Review 2018

With the sun shining and smiles all over the faces of its largely familiar crowd, there was a sense of occasion in the air. Many who attend this grassroots event are regulars, so the community vibe at Fieldview is palpable. Started in 2007 by the Cameron Brothers, the festival is a not-for-profit affair, run entirely by volunteers, with a strong emphasis on community, sustainability and charity. In its 12 years, Fieldview has donated more than £30,000 to a number of important local and international charities and good causes – with this year’s focus charity being Whale and Dolphin Conservation.

With the sun shining and smiles were all over the faces of its largely familiar crowd, there was a sense of occasion in the air

Fieldview Review 2018

There is a strong and very apparent sense of environmental sustainability that can be felt throughout the festival, from their 100% biodegradable plates and cutlery rule, to the constant army of litter pickers roaming the site. Many of the musical acts and food vendors are sourced locally too, which not only adds to the community feel of Fieldview, but helps towards reducing their carbon footprint, with up to 80% of an event’s harmful emissions coming as a direct impact of transport to and from.

As an attendee of many festivals, Fieldview is genuinely one of the cleanest festival sites I’ve ever been to. Eavis and his ‘leave no trace’ campaign would be proud.

The fancy dress theme for this year was The Natural World and the level of effort put in by attendees was – as usual – high. I saw safari guides, a tree, the sun and a smack of jellyfish, amongst others. Personally, I worked deep into the night before making a lion costume, which as it happens didn’t turn out to be as obvious as I had thought. I got called a mouse, a bear and even a badger (?). But such is life.

Fieldview Review 2018

A stripped back version of last year’s event saw the removal of one of the main tents, condensing the weekend’s music into three main stages. A favourite Fieldview tradition, Rockeoke took to the main stage on Thursday night with their ever-evolving cast belting out rock classics. A particular highlight  was Reverend Lemon’s cameo, when the king of dad rock came on and pulled off the difficult classic Born to be Wild.

Another highlight from the Fieldview alumni was the return of Mouse Outfit. And although they were missing a few of our favourite vocalists including Sparkz and Dr Syntax, they still put on a good show. And the crowd were treated to some classics like Sit Back, and Who Gwan Test to end the set.

Fieldview Review 2018

Drum and bass vocalist Jenna G’s reinvention as funk and soul-infused live band Jenna & the G’s delivered a perfect sound for a Fieldview crowd, with old floor filler classics from the likes of Netsky, Chase & Status and Zed Bias reimagined for a more dynamic and engaging live sound.

Drum and bass vocalist Jenna G’s reinvention as funk and soul-infused live band Jenna & the G’s delivered a perfect sound for a Fieldview crowd

Fieldview Review 2018

In my eyes, Fieldview remained an ever-present stalwart amongst a rapidly growing number of peers. Having cut my festival teeth at Reading Festival, it showed a 19-year-old me that not all festivals were all about smashing up toilets and setting fire to tents. It’s a festival with a heart and a conscience.

Thanks for laughs Fieldview, you will be sorely missed.